Fuck Yeah Queer Latin@s

Anonymous asked: There are actually LOTS of trans women drag performers in the United States, of various races and ethnicities. The trans community for some reason likes to ignore their existence but in fact some of the most famous drag queens are trans women.

We definitely agree. Drag as an expression of queer/trans identities was created by trans women. For many women, it was an act of radical defiance since there were laws in place that forbade the use of clothes that did not coordinate with your gender assigned at birth.

We’d argue that the split between drag and trans communities is a result of transmisogyny on the part of cis performers who wanted to distance themselves from trans women, and the white supremacist respectability politics in place by white trans women who wanted to distance themselves from trans women of color and other poor trans women who often engage with drag to survive (since it’s one of the few places where cis queers allow trans women to be employed).

We were in no way saying that no trans women do drag, because honestly they created it. However, we are saying that for the most part drag in Latin America has a much closer and tighter tie with trans women’s culture and activism in a way that differs from the US

Hi! I’m the founder of The Ultimate Asexual Playlist, which is a blog dedicated to asexual and aromantic music. Since we just started, I was wondering if you’d be willing to give a signal boost for our Mod Search?

Hey! Are you Aro/Ace spectrum and a music-lover? Then we want YOU! The Ultimate Asexual Playlist is looking for moderators to help post and/or reblog asexual and aromantic songs. (Please note that we are only looking for Aro and/or Ace spectrum bloggers, please and thanks.)

Mod Application (please send as a submission or fanmail to Haxaaya)

Name:

Pronouns:

Are you Aromantic and/or Asexual Spectrum? (please specify):

Favourite Genre/s of Music:

Short Mod bio (to go on the about page):

Email (so I can add you to the blog):

At this time we’re looking for 3-5 moderators.

[Also, we’re looking esp. for DMAB and PoC mods, since we’ve had mostly white and/or DFAB applicants]

Hello! My name is Aileen. 24 year-old Mexicana, mestiza, bisexual, genderqueer. Master’s student in the mental health field y promotora de salud queriendo contribuir a reducir los índices de dispariedades de servicios de salud para la comunidad Latina LGBTQIA+.

I run a poetry blog where I post poetry in Spanish by famous authors and by amateur authors as well: Poesía en la lengua.

My personal blog is just a bit of everything I like and some social justice (mostly social justice): Sombrerería.

Anonymous asked: Hello! I'm curious to know the Spanish equivalents of all the terms we use in English to label each other. Could you help? Drag queen, queen, bottom, top, vers, bear, cub, otter, lipstick lesbian, queer, etc. Things like that.

There really are no “equivalents” when it comes to queer language in Spanish. They are often very culturally specific and different countries (and even different regions within a country) have different terms.

For instance, drag as an art is often intrinsically linked with trans women’s culture and activism (unlike in the US where it serves almost exclusively for cis gay male entertainment). Drag queens often identify as part of the 3 Ts of LGBTTT (transgénero, transsexual, transformista/trasvesti).

Similarly sex roles aren’t the same as they are in the US (often a man who only tops may be considered straight). But for the most part activo, pasivo, intercambio (or sometimes versatil) are used.

As for the other terms, like we’ve said they aren’t really equivalents (and a large portion of these are slurs) but other terms used are loca (sorta like queen), marimacha (butch woman), marica (also like queen), torta (lesbian), tortillera (lesbian), de ambiente (usually referring to someone who is queer).

Additionally, queer US American culture is exported to Latin America so sometimes people use literal translations, like oso for bears. But keep in mind, bear culture stems as a reaction to the hairless fixation of queer culture which doesn’t really exist in the same way in Latin America. So a bear counterculture is often redundant when in some parts of Latin America, for the most part, hair isn’t seen as negative.

smith-q-and-a:

just a few of the signs we made today for our rally on april 24 starting at 8:30AM! thanks to everyone who came out. 

(via laughingfish)

deviatesinc:

Azucena Maizani and Mercedes Simone, Argentinian tango singers who fully embraced the ‘compadre’ style of male singers of the genre. Tango music’s preoccupation with masculinity has muddled gender roles in Latin countries for over a century.

Long before the end of the century, men were practicing tango with men, learning from each other in the streets. The less experienced younger male dancers had to play the role of the woman when learning.

Women had not yet been formally introduced to the tango. At this point the dance was still not accepted socially. Young dancers might attempt the steps they knew at a carnival under the cover of the masses of people, or at a family dance with cousins in the afternoon. Because of its lack of acceptance it came to be danced in the outskirts of the city, not necessarily in the brothels as many people say. Tango’s introduction to the brothels came at a later date when it was known to be danced in places like “Laura’s” and “La Vasca’s”, brothels in disguise, where catering to their richer clientele might involve entertaining the client dancing the tango.

By 1909, tango had become a popular dance with dedicated tango venues and academies. Although women had became open tango participants, they were not yet considered partners to the men they danced with. The men simply needed someone to facilitate showing off their abilities. The nicknames of female dancers reveals their status, often describing their negative attributes: “Skinny”, “Chatterbox”, “Bowlegged” etc., Whereas the men were given nicknames which highlighted their manhood.

Even when the woman’s role in tango began to become more equalized, those that danced tango weren’t really considered “good girls” as the dancing was done after midnight. And so families looked down on tango dancing in halls, although they might allow it in their homes and would pass along steps from one family member to another. At that time, at the dances, woman were very outnumbered (about 10-1) and so only the best male dancers got to dance. So the tradition of men practicing with men was upheld.  

thesunrisesforall:

SelfieSunday cause I feel damn good!

thesunrisesforall:

SelfieSunday cause I feel damn good!

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Spoken Word Artists

He Swallowed - Written and narrated by Xicano Sol

When society influences you to act in ways that are not authentic to your true self, you end up swallowing a lot more than you think.”



fyqueerlatinxs:

Fuck Yeah Queer Latin@s at the Movies
Pedro: The True Story of Pedro Zamora (2008)
In 1994, Pedro Zamora was the first HIV-positive gay man to appear in a reality show on MTV. The audience of ‘The Real World: San Francisco’ identified easily with this articulate and handsome Latino. His presence on the show forced that audiences in the United States and abroad to engage with the topic of AIDS. Pedro, a screen adaptation of Pedro Zamora’s life, follows his childhood in Havana as the youngest of eight children, his emigration to the United States, his hard work as an AIDS activist, his appearance on ‘The Real World’ as well his final moments.

fyqueerlatinxs:

Fuck Yeah Queer Latin@s at the Movies

Pedro: The True Story of Pedro Zamora (2008)

In 1994, Pedro Zamora was the first HIV-positive gay man to appear in a reality show on MTV. The audience of ‘The Real World: San Francisco’ identified easily with this articulate and handsome Latino. His presence on the show forced that audiences in the United States and abroad to engage with the topic of AIDS. Pedro, a screen adaptation of Pedro Zamora’s life, follows his childhood in Havana as the youngest of eight children, his emigration to the United States, his hard work as an AIDS activist, his appearance on ‘The Real World’ as well his final moments.

(Source: imdb.com)